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Ratite Family Definition Essay

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Ratite (Animals) - Definition, meaning - Online Encyclopedia

Ratite (Animals)

Ratite s and humans[edit]
Ratite s and humans have had a long relationship starting with the use of the egg for water containers, jewelry, or other art medium. Male ostrich feathers were popular for hats during the 18th century, which led to hunting and sharp declines in populations.

Ratite s are large flightless birds like the rhea and ostrich.

BIRDS - RATITE S
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The emu is a ratite with small vestigial, a long neck and long, strong legs with three forward directed toes. It is the largest native bird of Australia. It stands about 180 cm tall, height of the back is about 1 m, and the body-weight may reach 55 kg.

Ratite s
Distribution
The shading illustrates the diver sity of this group - the darker the colour the greater the number of species. Data provided by WWF's Wildfinder.

Since ratite s do not fly. they no longer need a keel. Other ratite s include cassowaries, kiwis, moas and emus.

Unlike the ratite s, to which they are most closely related, tinamou s have a breastbone and can fly. Their flight however is not strong, and they are adept runners. Their main response to danger is to remain perfectly still allowing their cryptic colouration to protect them.

The kiwi is generally nocturnal (most active at night). It belongs to the group of ratite s, flightless birds that also include the ostrich. emu. and rhea. There are 6 species of kiwi (genus Apteryx ). The kiwi is in danger of extinction.

Zoo Diet
: Ratite maintenance diet, apples, carrots, romaine lettuce, oyster shell /insoluble grit.
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New fossil ratite (Aves: Palaeognathae) eggshell discoveries from the Late Miocene Baynunah Formation of the United Arab Emirates, Arabian peninsula. Palaeontologia Electronica 9(2A):1-13.
Bledsoe, A. H. 1988. A phylogenetic analysis of postcranial skeletal characters of the ratite birds.

The natural history of the Emu in comparison with that of other ratite s. In H. J. Firth and J. H. Calaby (eds.), Proceedings of the 16th International Ornithological Congress. Australian Academy of Science. ISBN 0858470381.
Department of Environment and Climate Change, New South Wales Government. 2002. Emu.

Like its larger cousins the cassowary. emu. ostrich. and rhea. the kiwi is classified as a ratite. Most birds have a special ridge on their sternum, called a keel, where flight muscles attach, but ratite s don't need keels because they don't fly.

The Ostrich belongs to the Struthioniformes order of (ratite s). Other members include rheas, emus, cassowaries and the largest bird ever, the now-extinct Elephant Bird (Aepyornis).

Flightless and Loving it: Their adaptation to a terrestrial life is extensive: like all ratite s they have no keel on the breastbone to anchor wing muscles, and barely any wings either: the vestiges are so small that they are invisible under the kiwi 's bristly, hair-like, two-branched feathers.

The rheas belong to a group of birds known as ratite s which includes the Ostrich (Struthio camel us) from Africa, the Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius) and Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) from Australia and kiwis (Apteryx spp.) from New Zealand.

They are a member of the ratite family with ostrich es and emus. They have three claws on each foot. With their powerful legs they can either out run or kick at a potential predator. They have even been known to attack people on horseback.

Marchant, S. and Higgins, P.J. (1990) Handbook of Australian, New Zealand & Antarctic Birds. Volume 1 Ratite s to Ducks. Part A Ratite s to Petrel s. Oxford University Press. Melbourne, Australia
Reilly, P. (1994) Penguin s of the world. Oxford University Press. South Melbourne, Australia.

Africa Bird Guide Information: The ostrich (struthio camel us) is a member of a group of birds known as ratite s, that is they are flightless birds without a keel to their breastbone.
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Guano birds.

Other articles

What does ratite mean? definition and meaning (Free English Language Dictionary)

Flightless birds having flat breastbones lacking a keel for attachment of flight muscles: ostriches; cassowaries; emus; moas; rheas; kiwis; elephant birds

Nouns denoting animals

Hypernyms ("ratite" is a kind of. ):

bird (warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrates characterized by feathers and forelimbs modified as wings)

Hyponyms (each of the following is a kind of "ratite"):

ostrich ; Struthio camelus (fast-running African flightless bird with two-toed feet; largest living bird)

cassowary (large black flightless bird of Australia and New Guinea having a horny head crest)

apteryx ; kiwi (nocturnal flightless bird of New Zealand having a long neck and stout legs; only surviving representative of the order Apterygiformes)

rhea ; Rhea americana (larger of two tall fast-running flightless birds similar to ostriches but three-toed; found from Brazil to Patagonia)

nandu ; Pterocnemia pennata ; rhea (smaller of two tall fast-running flightless birds similar to ostriches but three-toed; found from Peru to Strait of Magellan)

aepyornis ; elephant bird (huge (to 9 ft.) extinct flightless bird of Madagascar)

moa (extinct flightless bird of New Zealand)

carinate (birds having keeled breastbones for attachment of flight muscles)

Learn English with. Proverbs of the week

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"Who does well, meets goodwill." (Dutch proverb)

RATITE: related words searches

Definition of ratite

The term 'ratite ' as it applies to the area of agriculture can be defined as ' A family of large flightless birds that include ostriches, emus, and rheas, which U.S. farmers are beginning to domesticate and raise for food. Ratite inspection has become a policy issue because producers want USDA to include them under the mandatory meat and poultry inspection laws. If plants that slaughter and process these birds were under mandatory inspection, most of the cost would be covered by taxpayers. Currently, such plants must pay for USDA inspection on a fee-for-service basis, under a voluntary ratite inspection program instituted in 1995 under authority of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946'.

The term 'ratite ' as it applies to the area of general science can be defined as 'of, like or pertaining to flightless birds'.

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Ratite definition

Definition of the noun ratite

What does ratite mean as a name of something?

noun - plural: ratites

  1. flightless birds having flat breastbones lacking a keel for attachment of flight muscles: ostriches; cassowaries; emus; moas; rheas; kiwis; elephant birds
    • lexical domain. Animals - nouns denoting animals
    • synonyms of ratite. flightless bird / ratite bird
    • antonym of ratite. carinate
    • more generic word. bird = warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrates characterized by feathers and forelimbs modified as wings
    • more specific terms :
      • Struthio camelus / ostrich = fast-running African flightless bird with two-toed feet
      • cassowary = large black flightless bird of Australia and New Guinea having a horny head crest
      • Dromaius novaehollandiae / Emu novaehollandiae / emu = large Australian flightless bird similar to the ostrich but smaller
      • apteryx / kiwi = nocturnal flightless bird of New Zealand having a long neck and stout legs
      • Rhea americana / rhea = larger of two tall fast-running flightless birds similar to ostriches but three-toed
      • Pterocnemia pennata / nandu / rhea = smaller of two tall fast-running flightless birds similar to ostriches but three-toed
      • elephant bird / aepyornis = huge (to 9 ft.) extinct flightless bird of Madagascar
      • moa = extinct flightless bird of New Zealand
Alternative definition of the noun ratite
  1. A bird of the order of Struthioniformes, a diverse group of large running, flightless birds, mostly extinct, but including the cassowary, elephant bird, emu, kiwi, moa, ostrich, rhea and tinamou
Printed dictionaries and other books with definitions for ratite

Click on a title to look inside that book (if available):

Biology (2015)

by Cram101 Textbook Reviews

Ratite. A ratite is any of a diverse group of large, flightless birds of the superorder Palaeognathae. There is still some controversy regarding the systematics involved. Some sources state that Ratites are synonymous with Struthioniformes, while.

Tree Thinking, An Introduction to Phylogenetic Biology (2015)

Biology, Biological evolution by Cram101 Textbook Reviews

Ratite. A ratite is any of a diverse group of large, flightless birds of the superorder Palaeognathae. There is still some controversy regarding the systematics involved. Some sources state that Ratites are synonymous with Struthioniformes, while.

e-Study Guide for Ecology, textbook by Cain (2012)

Biology, Ecology by Cram101 Textbook Reviews

Ratite. A ratite is any of a diverse group of.

Ratite - Dictionary Definition

n flightless birds having flat breastbones lacking a keel for attachment of flight muscles: ostriches; cassowaries; emus; moas; rheas; kiwis; elephant birds

birds having keeled breastbones for attachment of flight muscles

fast-running African flightless bird with two-toed feet; largest living bird

large black flightless bird of Australia and New Guinea having a horny head crest

large Australian flightless bird similar to the ostrich but smaller

nocturnal flightless bird of New Zealand having a long neck and stout legs; only surviving representative of the order Apterygiformes

larger of two tall fast-running flightless birds similar to ostriches but three-toed; found from Brazil to Patagonia

smaller of two tall fast-running flightless birds similar to ostriches but three-toed; found from Peru to Strait of Magellan

huge (to 9 ft.) extinct flightless bird of Madagascar

extinct flightless bird of New Zealand

the largest moa; about 12 feet high

the smallest moa; slender moa about the size of a large turkey

warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrates characterized by feathers and forelimbs modified as wings