Essay for you

The Sermon At Benares Analysis Essay

Rating: 4.0/5.0 (40 Votes)

Category: Essay

Description

Sermon At Benares Essay Research Paper The

Sermon At Benares Essay, Research Paper

The Sermon at Benares

Bill Conway 3-4-97 Rel 103 3:00

1.The two extremes in which the Buddha speaks of are: that conjoined with

the passions and luxury, low, vulgar, common, ignoble and useless. The second

is: that conjoined with self-torture, painful, ignoble, and useless. The

avoidance of these two extremes is the path to enlightenment of the middle path

as the Buddha had. The middle path produces insight and knowledge, and tends to

calm, to higher knowledge, enlightenment, Nirvana. 2. The Buddha speaks of

four noble truths. They are as follows: 1) The noble truth of suffering. 2) The

noble truth of cause of suffering. 3) The noble truth of the cessation of

suffering, the cessation without a remainder of craving, the abandonment,

forsaking, release, non-attachment. 4) The noble truth of the way that leads to

the cessation of suffering. 3.The eight-fold path is namely, right views,

right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort,

right mindfulness, and right concentration. 4.Nirvana is the absolute

enlightenment that leads to purification of the soul. It is achieved through

the belief in the four noble truths and the action taken to use or follow them.

This all together provides enlightenment and the ultimate goal of reaching

Nirvana. Nirvana also means, you are at one with Buddha and have gained the

respect of him. Ultimately it is similar to the belief of heaven and God.

Other articles

NCERT Solutions for Ch 10th: The Sermon at Benares English - Study Rankers

NCERT Solutions for Ch 10th: The Sermon at Benares English

Thinking about the Text

1. When her son dies, Kisa Gotami goes from house to house. What does she ask for? Does she get it? Why not?

When Kisa Gotami’s son died, she went from house to house, asking if she could get some medicine that would cure her child.
No, she did not get it because her child was dead and no medicine could have brought him back to life.

2. Kisa Gotami again goes from house to house after she speaks with the Buddha. What does she ask for, the second time around? Does she get it? Why not?

Answer

When she met the Buddha, he asked her to get a handful of mustard seeds from a house where no one had lost a child, husband, parent, or friend. She went from house to house, but could not get the mustard seeds because there was not a single house where no one had died in the family.

3. What does Kisa Gotami understand the second time that she failed to understand the first time? Was this what the Buddha wanted her to understand?

Answer

Kisa Gotami understood the second time that death is common to all and that she was being selfish in her grief. There was no house where some beloved had not died.
Yes, this was what the Buddha wanted her to understand.

4. Why do you think Kisa Gotami understood this only the second time? In what way did the Buddha change her understanding?

Answer

Kisa Gotami understood that death is common to all and that she was being selfish in her grief. She understood this only the second time because it was then that she found that there was not a single house where some beloved had not died.

First time round, she was only thinking about her grief and was therefore asking for a medicine that would cure her son. When she met the Buddha, he asked her to get a handful of mustard seeds from a house where no one had died. He did this purposely to make her realize that there was not a single house where no beloved had died, and that death is natural. When she went to all the houses the second time, she felt dejected that she could not gather the mustard seeds. Then, when she sat and thought about it, she realized that the fate of men is such that they live and die. Death is common to all. This was what the Buddha had intended her to understand.


5. How do you usually understand the idea of ‘selfishness’? Do you agree with Kisa Gotami that she was being ‘selfish in her grief’?

Answer

Selfishness is preoccupation with I, me, and myself. Kisa Gotami was not in a position to think about other people’s grief. It is natural to feel sad over death of near and dear ones. But most people carry on their next responsibility of performing proper last rites of the dead. People seldom carry a dead body in the hope of some miracle happening to that. The family and the society always comes to be with those in hours of grief. But later on the life goes on. But Kisa Gotami was so engrossed in her sorrow that she forgot to think about live members of her family and society.

Thinking about the Language

I. This text is written in an old-fashioned style, for it reports an incident more than two millennia old. Look for the following words and phrases in the text, and try to rephrase them in more current language, based on how you understand them.

give thee medicine for thy child
Pray tell me
Kisa repaired to the Buddha
there was no house but someone had died in it
kinsmen
Mark!


Answer

1. Give you medicine for your child
2. Please tell me
3. Kisa went to the Buddha
4. There was no house where no one had died
5. Relatives
6. Listen

II. You know that we can combine sentences using words like and, or, but, yet and then. But sometimes no such word seems appropriate. In such a case was can use a semicolon (;) or a dash (−) to combine two clauses.

She has no interest in music; I doubt she will become a singer like her mother.

The second clause here gives the speaker’s opinion on the first clause.

Here is a sentence from the text that uses semicolons to combine clauses. Break up the sentence into three simple sentences. Can you then say which has a better rhythm when you read it, the single sentence using semicolons, or the three simple sentences?

For there is not any means by which those who have been born can avoid dying; after reaching old age there is death; of such a nature are living beings.

Answer

The single sentence using semicolons has a better rhythm. This is because the three parts of the sentence are connected to each other in their meanings. The second clause gives further information on the first clause. The third clause is directly related to both the first and the second. Their meanings are better conveyed when they are joined by semicolons.

Sermon at Benares Essay

Free Essays Must Be Free! TM Sermon At Benares Term paper

While the free essays can give you inspiration for writing, they cannot be used 'as is' because they will not meet your assignment's requirements. If you are in a time crunch, then you need a custom written term paper on your subject (sermon at benares)
Here you can hire an independent writer/researcher to custom write you an authentic essay to your specifications that will pass any plagiarism test (e.g. Turnitin). Waste no more time!

The Sermon at Benares
The Sermon at Benares Bill Conway 3-4-97 Rel 103 3:00 1. The two extremes in which the Buddha speaks of are: that conjoined with the passions and luxury, low, vulgar.

The Sermon at Benares Bill Conway 3-4-97 Rel 103 3:00 1. The two extremes in which the Buddha speaks of are: that conjoined with the passions and luxury, low, vulgar, common, ignoble and useless. The second is: that conjoined with self-torture, painful, ignoble, and useless. The avoidance of these two extremes is the path to enlightenment of the middle path as the Buddha had. The middle path produces insight and knowledge, and tends to calm, to higher

Buddah
Buddha Indian philosopher and the founder of Buddhism, born in Lumbini, Nepal. He was theson of the head of the Sakya warrior caste, with the private name of Siddhartha ;in.

knowledge, enlightenment, Nirvana. 2. The Buddha speaks of four noble truths. They are as follows: 1) The noble truth of suffering. 2) The noble truth of cause of suffering. 3) The noble truth of the cessation of suffering, the cessation without a remainder of craving, the abandonment, forsaking, release, non-attachment. 4) The noble truth of the way that leads to the cessation of suffering. 3. The eight-fold path is namely, right views, right intention, right speech, right action,

Buddah
Buddha Indian philosopher and the founder of Buddhism, born in Lumbini, Nepal. He was theson of the head of the Sakya warrior caste, with the private name of Siddhartha ;in.

right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration. 4. Nirvana is the absolute enlightenment that leads to purification of the soul. It is achieved through the belief in the four noble truths and the action taken to use or follow them. This all together provides enlightenment and the ultimate goal of reaching Nirvana. Nirvana also means, you are at one with Buddha and have gained the respect of him. Ultimately it is similar to the belief

Buddah
Buddha Indian philosopher and the founder of Buddhism, born in Lumbini, Nepal. He was theson of the head of the Sakya warrior caste, with the private name of Siddhartha ;in.

of heaven and God.

The rest of the paper is available free of charge to our registered users. The registration process just couldn't be easier. Log in or register now. It is all free!

More College Papers

Sacred Divine essay
The Sacred Divine I believe the Divine sacred is something more powerful than anything on earth. Not necessarily in a physical sense but more in a spiritual. I feel that the youth of today, more than any other time in the world's history, needs to know something about what their parents

Roots of Judaism and Christianity essay
The Roots of Judaism and Christianity (i) Judaism: The Jews are a people who trace their descent from the biblical Israelites and who are united by the religion called Judaism. They are not a race; Jewish identity is a mixture of ethnic, national, and religious elements. An individual

Right To Life essay
The Right To Life Life is a right held by all creatures on the universe, everything has life; however, everything also has it's own character or individuality. Every person is his or her own self and does what he or she wishes to do to a certain extent. Many people are opposed to an individu

The sermon at benares

Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. If you continue browsing the site, you agree to the use of cookies on this website. See our User Agreement and Privacy Policy.

Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. If you continue browsing the site, you agree to the use of cookies on this website. See our Privacy Policy and User Agreement for details.

Explore all your favorite topics in the SlideShare app Get the SlideShare app to Save for Later — even offline

Continue to the mobile site »

  • Upload
  • Login
  • Signup

Double tap to zoom out

The sermon at benares

Share this SlideShare

LinkedIn Corporation © 2017

Buddhism: The Sermon at Benares

Buddhism: The Sermon at Benares

The two extremes in which the Buddha speaks of are: that conjoined with the passions and luxury, low, vulgar, common, ignoble and useless. The second is: that conjoined with self-torture, painful, ignoble, and useless. The avoidance of these two extremes is the path to enlightenment of the middle path as the Buddha had. The middle path produces insight and knowledge, and tends to calm, to higher knowledge, enlightenment, Nirvana.

1) The noble truth of suffering.

2) The noble truth of cause of suffering.

3) The noble truth of the cessation of suffering, the cessation without a remainder of craving, the abandonment, forsaking, release, non-attachment.

The noble truth of the way that leads to the cessation of suffering. The eight-fold path is namely, right views, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration.

Nirvana is the absolute enlightenment that leads to purification of the soul. It is achieved through the belief in the four noble truths and the action taken to use or follow them. This all together provides enlightenment and the ultimate goal of reaching Nirvana. Nirvana also means, you are at one with Buddha and have gained the respect of him. Ultimately it is similar to the belief of heaven and God.