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One Essex Court Essay Competition

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50th Anniversary Essay Writing Competition on Vimeo

As part of our 50th Anniversary celebrations The University of Essex are running an essay competition. Students will have to write a 3000-5000 word essay based upon one of our six research strand areas. There will be a winner for the best essay from each research strand with a prize of £500 each and an overall winner who will win £1000.

To find out more email outreach@essex.ac.uk or tweet @UoEOutreach

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50th Anniversary Essay Writing Competition

As part of our 50th Anniversary celebrations The University of Essex are running an essay competition. Students will have to write a 3000-5000 word essay based upon one of our six research strand areas. There will be a winner for the best essay from each…

As part of our 50th Anniversary celebrations The University of Essex are running an essay competition. Students will have to write a 3000-5000 word essay based upon one of our six research strand areas. There will be a winner for the best essay from each research strand with a prize of £500 each and an overall winner who will win £1000.

To find out more email outreach@essex.ac.uk or tweet @UoEOutreach

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One Essex Court

One Essex Court is a set of barristers' chambers in London, specialising in commercial litigation, which was founded in 1966.
Currently comprising 85 full-time members, 32 of whom are silks or Queen's Counsel. One Essex Court's members include well-known silks Lord Grabiner QC and Laurence Rabinowitz QC. Prior to her appointment to the Commercial Court, Elizabeth Gloster QC was a member. MORE

One Essex Court is a set of barristers' chambers in London, specialising in commercial litigation, which was founded in 1966.

Currently comprising 85 full-time members, 32 of whom are silks or Queen's Counsel. One Essex Court's members include well-known silks Lord Grabiner QC and Laurence Rabinowitz QC. Prior to her appointment to the Commercial Court, Elizabeth Gloster QC was a member.

One Essex Court is considered to be part of the Bar's Magic Circle. It is ranked in the top band for commercial litigation by both Chambers and Partners and Legal 500. It has a turnover of £46.5 million a year.

In 2012, One Essex Court opened a new international office in Singapore.

One Essex Court also runs an annual essay competition for students in conjunction with The Times .

One Essex Court offers one of the highest pupillage awards at the Bar, £60,000.

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LSE - London School of Economics - Department of Law - Students

Broadly, there are two kinds of mooting that you can get involved in at the LSE, 'internal' and 'external'.

1. Internal moots

The internal mooting competition is internal to the LSE � it involves only LSE law students competing against one another. It is open to all undergraduate law students, and is designed for those with little or no experience of mooting, and those who wish to develop their mooting skills is a relatively relaxed and less competitive setting. Students with no experience will be taught about what mooting is, and to learn how to moot through low-stress practice moots.

A timetable of events will be provided at the mooting training run by the LSESU Law Society. Competitions will then be advertised throughout the year by the Bar Society and Law Society.

If you are interested in participating in this program, or finding out more about it, please send an email to the Law Society (Internal) Mooting Officer (lsemootingofficer@gmail.com ). The staff member who assists the Law Society with internal moots is Michael Wilkinson ( M.Wilkinson@lse.ac.uk ).

2. External moots

External mooting refers to mooting competitions in which the LSE sends representative teams to compete against other universities. This is typically for those with some prior mooting experience � it is usually the case, for example, that students have a year in the internal mooting competition and then move on to representative mooting.

Information on the external moots the LSE enters can be found on the right hand side of this page. In addition, there will be announcements made in some classes about these moots.

These external moots can themselves be broken down into two groups. In the first group, there are a number of UK-based competitions, such as the Essex Court moot and the new London University Mooting Shield. The moot problems can cover a wide range of the core legal courses (contract, tort, property, EU law, etc.). LSE teams in these competitions will be competing against other UK universities. If you are interested in participating in these moots, or finding out more about them, please email lsemootingofficer@gmail.com .

In the second group are a series of subject-specific moots, which are often international - ie, LSE teams may end up competing against the teams from the top world universities. These competitions are open to both grads and undergrads. They include the Jessup International Law competition, the Price Media Law moot, the European Law Moot Competition and others to be found in the list to the right. If you are interested in participating in any of these moots, please email Andrew Scott (A.D.Scott@lse.ac.uk ) with your name, best contact email address, and a list of the moots you are interested in doing in order of preference.

Booking the Moot Court Room

The LSE Department of Law has a dedicated Moot Court Room (MCR) located on the 7th floor of LSE�s New Academic Building. The room is most commonly used for mooting by Department of Law students, but is also occasionally used for internal meetings and small-scale events and seminars. The MCR is also available to hire to external visitors through LSE Event Services. If you are a member of staff within the LSE Department of Law, please email law.room.bookings@lse.ac.uk to book the MCR. If you are from another LSE department, or are external to LSE, and interested in hiring the MCR, please email Event.Services@lse.ac.uk. All student bookings must be supported by a member of the academic staff.

LSE Mooters in action

Five ways to get the best value out of your law degree

Five ways to get the best value out of your law degree

Tuesday 3 May 2011 13.10 BST

S o much for the government's estimate that average tuition fees would be £7,500. With the majority of universities set to charge the full £9,000 when the fee cap is removed next year, the actual average currently stands more than £1,000 higher than anticipated – at almost £8,700.

Such amounts may have little impact on those destined for elite City law firms and leading commercial barristers' chambers, which pay trainees about £40,000 a year. But law students who pursue careers in areas such as legal aid, where entry-level earnings are among the lowest of any graduate job, look set to be weighed down by their university debts for years to come.

How, then, can prospective lawyers keep the financial damage to a minimum, while at the same time gain CV-boosting experience to help them stand out in a graduate job market that's more competitive than ever?

Do a "vac scheme" – even if you have no intention of joining up full time

Corporate law firms' formal work experience programmes – which pay up to £300 a week – have traditionally been the preserve of City types. But the impressive breadth of some "vac schemes" make them worthwhile for students planning careers in other areas of law, where paid work experience is much harder to come by.

Clifford Chance and Linklaters, for example, offers interns the opportunity to do pro bono – good experience for those who want to go into publicly funded legal practice. Herbert Smith and Hill Dickinson allows placement students to spend time in their specialist advocacy units, which employ in-house barristers – an excellent opportunity for bar wannabes who miss out on one of the few paid chambers work experience gigs (the handful of chambers offering funded mini-pupillages include One Gray's Inn Square, 2 Temple Gardens, Pump Court Tax and 5 Stone Buildings).

A word of warning, though: "Commercial firms want vac scheme students who are committed to their core business," says Edward Walker, graduate recruitment manager at national law firm Pinsent Masons. "Those who aren't may get found out during interview."

Don't undervalue unglamorous part-time jobs

Walker thinks a good strategy for law students is to find regular paid part-time work – however unglamorous – to help them survive, then weave what they have learned from it into their CVs in a thoughtful way.

"A student working on the checkout at Sainsbury's is more impressive than they often realise," he says, adding that law firms have become slightly tired of CVs featuring "a long list of exciting-sounding, yet not especially substantial, jobs".

Walker continues: "Let's not forget that companies like Sainsbury's are law firms' core clients. Understanding how their business works from the bottom up is very useful."

The experience of first-year Manchester University law student Joseph Tomlinson bears this out: "To my amazement, barristers' chambers have been impressed by the fact I worked as a chef during my A-levels, because of the transferable skills it gave me. Despite this I have been repeatedly told by my careers service to leave this role off my CV because it has no relevance to law."

Find time for unpaid pro bono

While law firms and barristers' chambers value exposure to the commercial world, they are also keen on applicants with hands-on experience advising clients on legal matters. "Pro bono shows commitment to being a lawyer," says Pinsent Masons' Walker. But how do students fit in pro bono work – which often involves the time-consuming process of getting your head around new areas of law – when their evenings are spent at Sainsbury's and their holidays full of work-experience placements?

One way is to select a degree course where pro bono work is included as part of the curriculum. The law schools at the Universities of Kent (which won best law school at the annual LawWorks and Attorney General Student pro bono awards), Hull and Northumbria are all known for their "clinical" approach to legal education. Students at the former are encouraged to base their dissertations on issues arising from the real-life cases on which they have acted. "Pro bono works best when it's not an add-on," says Elaine Heslop, a lecturer and clinic solicitor at the University of Kent.

Like pro bono work, mooting (mock advocacy conducted in a courtroom setting) is time-consuming. "I won't pretend that I haven't lost a lot of sleep preparing bundles and skeleton arguments," says Karamvir Chadha, who won the 2009 English Speaking Union-Essex Court Chambers national mooting competition. Unlike pro bono work, though, mooting can offer substantial financial rewards: for his triumph Chadha picked up a cash prize of £1,000; a similar sum is awarded to the winner of the other main national mooting event, the Oxford University Press & BPP national mooting competition.

For those who prefer to make their arguments on paper – and are sufficiently motivated to spend their free time writing yet more essays – the rewards can be even greater. The annual Times and One Essex Court legal essay competition pays out £10,000 worth of prizes, out of which £3,500 goes to the writer of the winning piece.

Take a gap year and hope a law firm will do a KPMG

Earlier this year, accountants KPMG launched an initiative to sponsor students through undergraduate degrees while they work part-time for the firm, which will see it cover tuition fees, pay them a salary and give them a full-time job at the end of the course.

Law firms have been looking on with interest. James Furber, senior partner at Farrer & Co, is in favour of his firm adopting a similar initiative "to keep a route into the profession open for students from less well off backgrounds", as is Michael Shaw, head of national law firm Cobbetts. And College of Law chief executive Nigel Savage says he has "meetings lined up" with several magic circle (the five leading London-based) law firms about sponsoring students through its recently launched two-year accelerated undergraduate law degree. Those not keen on parting with £9,000 a year will hope that other firms follow KPMG's lead.

Alex Aldridgeis a freelance journalist who writes about law and education

International mooting - Essex Court Chambers

International mooting The 2016/17 Competition

Now in its 6th year, applications will shortly be open for the 2016/17 ECC-SAL International Mooting Competition. The Competition is held a the Supreme Court of Singapore, in conjunction with the Singapore Academy of Law.

The Competition is open to young advocates from Australia, Brunei, Hong Kong, India, Malaysia, Singapore, New Zealand, and South Korea, with fewer than 3 years PQE as at 1 January 2017.

Mooting will take place between 7 and 11 January 2017, with the Final held in the Supreme Court Auditorium on 11 January 2017. The Competition will be based on a single Moot Problem, governed by English law.

For further details on eligibility and registration, please download the ECC-SAL Mooting Competition Flyer .

If you have any questions about the Competition, please contact one of the members of the Organising Team:

History of the competition

Since 2011/2012, members of Essex Court Chambers have jointly hosted a mooting competition for junior lawyers (with fewer than 3 years’ Post-Qualification Experience) in Singapore, in conjunction with the Singapore Academy of Law.

This prestigious competition gives entrants an unrivalled opportunity to develop and demonstrate their advocacy and legal reasoning skills. It has traditionally attracted entries from teams of the highest calibre, both from Singaporean law firms and other Singaporean legal organisations (including from the Attorney-General’s Chambers and the Justices’ Law Clerks).

The judging panels for the competition in previous years have been composed of eminent members of the Singaporean legal community, including two Attorneys General of Singapore, Mr Sundaresh Menon SC and Mr Steven Chong SC (as they then were), as well as their Honours Justice Quentin Loh and Justice Vinodh Coomaraswamy of the Singapore High Court, together with senior practitioners at Essex Court Chambers, including Mr Michael Thomas CMG QC (former Attorney-General of Hong Kong).

The past winners of the competition have been:

  • 2016/17 – Nicholas Liu and Bethel Chan – Justices’ Law Clerks
  • 2015/16 – Devathas Satianathan and Gek Min Yeo – Justices’ Law Clerks
  • 2014/15 – Raeza Ibrahim & Sadhana Rai – Drew & Napier LLC
  • 2013/14 – Daniel Gaw & Nicholas Poon – Justices’ Law Clerks
  • 2012/13 – Joshua Lim & Keith Han – Justices’ Law Clerks
  • 2011/12 – Pardeep Singh Khosa & Mahesh Rai – Drew & Napier LLP
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