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Control Essay, Research Paper

Control is a word that can mean a variety of things. Control can mean having power and having command over something. It can mean restraint against outside forces, as well as manipulating other forces or persons. Control can be a limitation or influence over certain things or rule over certain people. Control is something that most people like to have over their own lives, no matter what the definition or interpretation of control might be. William Faulkner?s ?Barn Burning? and Herman Melville?s ?Bartleby, the Scrivener? are two short stories that have control as a central issue, but while ?Barn Burning? presents control from a standpoint of striking fear into others. Bartleby, the Scrivener? shows control trying to be gained through reasoning and influence over people.

Abner Snopes a character in ?Barn Burning. Abner is a hard man whose actions and personality are repeatedly described as making him a ?cold? man. Abner lives life by his own rules, and he tends to what matters to him. Abner has an obsession with fire, particularly with burning the barns of the people whom he crosses. After he commits his arson, he is driven out of town, only to have it happen in his family?s next residence and they are off to find a new place to live.

Abner controls both his family and others with fear and intimidation. When he hits his son Sartoris, Abner accuses him of wanting to tell the justice of the peace that he had burned the barn down. He further intimidates his son by telling him ?You?ve got to learn to stick to your own blood or you ain?t going to have any blood to stick to you (484). By doing using these tactics of power and brute force along with fear, he is able to control his son to make him do exactly what he wants Sartoris to do.

His actions are similar when he deals with Major de Spain?s possessions and servants. Abner rides up to the elegant home and steps in fresh horse manure. When the old black servant tells him to wipe his feet before his enters the house, Abner throws a racial slur at him and disregards the servant?s command. He then proceeds to spread the dung all over a white carpet in the house. Upon his exit, he scrapes what is left on his boot on the edge of the house?s steps. This scene shows once again how his cold appearance strikes fear into the servants and he has control over them, because they did not attempt to physically stop him from ruining the fine carpet.

Abner?s control over his family is shown again when he decides to burn the barn of Major de Spain. His physical control and prowess is shown when his wife tries to stop him and pleads with him not to do it, he just pushed her violently into a wall. His control is shown to be in effect even after his presumed death. Even after Sartoris had stopped his father from burning the barn and his father was killed by the gunshots, he thinks his father was a brave and honorable man. This shows that he had manipulated his family until they believed that he was right in his despicable actions.

In ?Bartleby, the Scrivener. Herman Melville depicts control to be more of psychological issue in contrast to the intimidation and fear directed by Abner Snopes in ?Barn Burning. The narrator of the story is an elderly lawyer who likes his life to be in order and thinks he has control of his life. While he is a lawyer, he doesn?t pursue criminal cases or the limelight that is often associated with his profession. Instead, the narrator prefers to immerse himself in legal documents such as deeds and wills, which are far less stressful and complicated matters.

The narrator hires Bartleby, who starts out as a very good worker who gorges himself in the work that is laid before him. Soon the narrator realizes that Bartleby is not all he had seemed to be. Bartleby started to refuse to do some work that was assigned to him by his employer, but saying simply ?I would prefer not to. This incenses the narrator, who tries to control Bartleby to no avail.

The narrator uses reason as his main method of trying to control and tame the already mellow and indifferent Bartleby. Many times he reminds Bartleby of his job description and duties as a scrivener and copyist. Other times he tries to use the opinions of his other workers to try and influence Bartleby to be sensible, but this too is done in vain and does not help the narrator in his attempt to control Bartleby and have his employee act in the manner he wants.

Bartleby finally stops working altogether, and the narrator rationally informs Bartleby that he must leave in six days. Once again, he cannot attempt to control Bartleby in any way, for he remained in the office as a permanent fixture. He tries to use logic against Bartleby by saying ?What earthly right do you have to stay here? Do you pay any rent? Do you pay my taxes? Or is this property yours? (129). The unwavering Bartleby still does not respond.

While the narrator in ?Bartleby, the Scrivener? uses practical methods to try to gain the control he desires, he does not succeed. Abner Snopes used a much different and atrocious method of intimidation and striking fear into his family and the ones he encountered, but he accomplished his goal nonetheless. This shows that in some cases to gain the control that is one may desire, extreme and brutal measures may have to be taken. The actual success of the two individuals is not the interest, but that the theme of control was attempted to be resolved in two entirely different manners.

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Control Essay Research Paper Russ CrawfordEnglish 115Analysis

Control Essay Research Paper Russ CrawfordEnglish 115Analysis

Control Essay, Research Paper

Control is a word that can mean a variety of things. Control can mean having power and having command over something. It can mean restraint against outside forces, as well as manipulating other forces or persons. Control can be a limitation or influence over certain things or rule over certain people. Control is something that most people like to have over their own lives, no matter what the definition or interpretation of control might be. William Faulkner?s ?Barn Burning? and Herman Melville?s ?Bartleby, the Scrivener? are two short stories that have control as a central issue, but while ?Barn Burning? presents control from a standpoint of striking fear into others. Bartleby, the Scrivener? shows control trying to be gained through reasoning and influence over people.

Abner Snopes a character in ?Barn Burning. Abner is a hard man whose actions and personality are repeatedly described as making him a ?cold? man. Abner lives life by his own rules, and he tends to what matters to him. Abner has an obsession with fire, particularly with burning the barns of the people whom he crosses. After he commits his arson, he is driven out of town, only to have it happen in his family?s next residence and they are off to find a new place to live.

Abner controls both his family and others with fear and intimidation. When he hits his son Sartoris, Abner accuses him of wanting to tell the justice of the peace that he had burned the barn down. He further intimidates his son by telling him ?You?ve got to learn to stick to your own blood or you ain?t going to have any blood to stick to you (484). By doing using these tactics of power and brute force along with fear, he is able to control his son to make him do exactly what he wants Sartoris to do.

His actions are similar when he deals with Major de Spain?s possessions and servants. Abner rides up to the elegant home and steps in fresh horse manure. When the old black servant tells him to wipe his feet before his enters the house, Abner throws a racial slur at him and disregards the servant?s command. He then proceeds to spread the dung all over a white carpet in the house. Upon his exit, he scrapes what is left on his boot on the edge of the house?s steps. This scene shows once again how his cold appearance strikes fear into the servants and he has control over them, because they did not attempt to physically stop him from ruining the fine carpet.

Abner?s control over his family is shown again when he decides to burn the barn of Major de Spain. His physical control and prowess is shown when his wife tries to stop him and pleads with him not to do it, he just pushed her violently into a wall. His control is shown to be in effect even after his presumed death. Even after Sartoris had stopped his father from burning the barn and his father was killed by the gunshots, he thinks his father was a brave and honorable man. This shows that he had manipulated his family until they believed that he was right in his despicable actions.

In ?Bartleby, the Scrivener. Herman Melville depicts control to be more of psychological issue in contrast to the intimidation and fear directed by Abner Snopes in ?Barn Burning. The narrator of the story is an elderly lawyer who likes his life to be in order and thinks he has control of his life. While he is a lawyer, he doesn?t pursue criminal cases or the limelight that is often associated with his profession. Instead, the narrator prefers to immerse himself in legal documents such as deeds and wills, which are far less stressful and complicated matters.

The narrator hires Bartleby, who starts out as a very good worker who gorges himself in the work that is laid before him. Soon the narrator realizes that Bartleby is not all he had seemed to be. Bartleby started to refuse to do some work that was assigned to him by his employer, but saying simply ?I would prefer not to. This incenses the narrator, who tries to control Bartleby to no avail.

The narrator uses reason as his main method of trying to control and tame the already mellow and indifferent Bartleby. Many times he reminds Bartleby of his job description and duties as a scrivener and copyist. Other times he tries to use the opinions of his other workers to try and influence Bartleby to be sensible, but this too is done in vain and does not help the narrator in his attempt to control Bartleby and have his employee act in the manner he wants.

Bartleby finally stops working altogether, and the narrator rationally informs Bartleby that he must leave in six days. Once again, he cannot attempt to control Bartleby in any way, for he remained in the office as a permanent fixture. He tries to use logic against Bartleby by saying ?What earthly right do you have to stay here? Do you pay any rent? Do you pay my taxes? Or is this property yours? (129). The unwavering Bartleby still does not respond.

While the narrator in ?Bartleby, the Scrivener? uses practical methods to try to gain the control he desires, he does not succeed. Abner Snopes used a much different and atrocious method of intimidation and striking fear into his family and the ones he encountered, but he accomplished his goal nonetheless. This shows that in some cases to gain the control that is one may desire, extreme and brutal measures may have to be taken. The actual success of the two individuals is not the interest, but that the theme of control was attempted to be resolved in two entirely different manners.

How to Suppress Women s Writing Analysis - Essay

How to Suppress Women's Writing How to Suppress Women's Writing Analysis - Essay

(Masterpieces of Women's Literature)

While admitting that women have not been subject to formal prohibitions against writing, as were black slaves in America, Russ nevertheless asserts that the informal prohibitions of poverty, lack of leisure, lack of education, and “climate of expectation”—the belief in traditional gender roles, which placed women in the home—were instrumental in preventing women from writing. Many women, particularly in the nineteenth century, were financially dependent on their families or their husbands; their household duties as either daughters or wives left them little if any time to write; and if they still expressed a willingness to create literature, the pressure of gender roles was brought to bear upon them—artistic creativity was a masculine ability not to be attempted by women.

Most of the text, however, is devoted to an identification and analysis of the practice of what Russ calls “bad faith,” a term borrowed from philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre. One displays bad faith by perpetuating the status quo in order to maintain discrimination. Women who insist on writing despite informal prohibitions are met with one or more of the following patterns of bad faith: denial of agency, pollution of agency, double standard of content, false categorizing, isolation, and anomalousness.

Denial of agency is used to refute a particular woman’s claim of authorship by asserting that the work in question was written by a man, that the text wrote itself, that the “masculine” part of the woman did the writing, or that the woman writer is “more than a woman.” Mary Shelley, for example, is denied authorship of Frankenstein (1818) by a male critic who asserts that she was simply a repository of ideas that were circulating “in the air around her.” Similarly, critics generally agree that Emily Brontë lost control of Wuthering Heights (1847) and wrote an entirely different novel than she had intended (that is, a “good” one).

Pollution of agency calls into play traditional gender roles; a woman who writes is unfeminine, ridiculous, or immoral. Jane Eyre (1847), published pseudonymously by Charlotte Brontë, was judged by critics to be a masterpiece if written by a man, degrading if written by a woman. Russ contends that the designation of much twentieth century poetry by women as confessional, or highly personal and therefore shameful, is a contemporary version of the nineteenth century charge of impropriety against women writers.

The double standard of content privileges male experience over female experience and renders women’s lives and experience invisible. Russ points out that critical assessment of Wuthering Heights changed from positive to negative after Emily Brontë’s authorship (and gender) became.

(The entire section is 1140 words.)

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Strategic Analysis Of ALDI Essay - 3647 Words

Strategic Analysis Of ALDI

Strategic Analysis of ALDI
Table of Contents

1. Introduction 2
2. Brief Background on Aldi 3
3. Market Identification of Aldi 4
4. Environmental Analysis 5
4.1 PESTEL Analysis 6
4.1.1 Political factors 6
4.1.2 Economical factors 6
4.1.3 Social and cultural factors 7
4.1.4 Technology factors 8
4.1.5 Environmental Factors 8
4.1.6 Legal factors 9
4.2 Key Trends affecting the industry 9
5. SWOT Analysis 10
5.1 Strengths 10
5.2 Weaknesses 11
5.2 SWOT Table 12
6. Identification and evaluation of the Strategies pursued by Aldi 13 6.1 Strategies implemented by ALDI 13
6.2 Critical Evaluation of the Strategies 14
7. Conclusion 16
8. References 16

Albrecht Discount Inc. globally known as Aldi, is a German based family owned global discount chain of supermarkets. Aldi constitutes of two independent groups, that are Aldi Nord (North) and Aldi Sud (South) legally and economically independent but family related (Aldi Sud Business, 2013). It is the market leader in the industry of international grocery retailing and owns and operates chain of discount grocery stores in Europe, Australia and United States. It’s stores retail and supply general merchandise and food including meat products, fresh meat, frozen and refrigerated foods, sweets and snacks, dairy and bakery products, beverages and pantry items in addition to home care and personal care products (Report Linker, 2013). In the present Aldi Inc.’s strategic analysis is carried out to identify and evaluate its strategies against its business environment to critically analyze whether the strategies pursued by Aldi are effective in maintaining its market leader position or not. In doing so environmental analysis of international grocery retailing industry is carried out to bring about the opportunities and threats the industry is facing and SWOT analysis is carried out to shed light on Aldi’s strengths and weaknesses and opportunities and threats the industry is facing on the whole. Aldi’s strategies are then evaluated against the SWOT to analyze the effectiveness of its strategies in maintaining its market position.

2. Brief Background on Aldi

Aldi Inc. was founded by Karl Albrecht and Theo Albrecht in 1913 in Essen and started trading in bakery products, later in 1914 Karl Albrecht’s wife Anna Albrecht opened the first grocery store. In 1919 they acquired a commercial and residential building in Essen and enlarge the grocery store. 1945 the brothers took over the family business and opened more stores and by the end of 1948 they were four Albrecht stores. In 1954 Albrecht expanded further more and opened its stores outside Essen and branch enlargement took place with 77 stores with core business as food self service. In 1961 two legally separate groups were established known as Aldi Sud and Aldi Nord yet the family remained connected. 1962 first ALDI – Albrecht Discount branched was opened in the discount principle and entire branch network was changed into ALDI format. Gradually internationalized its business by first entering in Austria with acquisition of Hofer retail chain, then further expanded in Germany, entered in the United States, UK, Ireland, Australia, Switzerland, Slovenia and Hungary, in that order (Aldi Sud Facts and Figures, 2013). Aldi Group is active in nine European countries and in European market is one of the leading retail companies and a well known retail chain all over the world. Aldi Sud is into retail food trade and comprises of 31 companies located in Southern and Western Germany and Aldi Nord operates its own branch network of 2500 outlets in the northern and eastern Germany (Aldi Sud Business, 2013; Aldi Nord, 2013). Aldi Group has more than 10000 stores worldwide with annual turnover of 75bn yet its core market is Germany (Fitzgerald, 2013). Aldi stores are known for their efficiency, no frills stores, low levels of staff, few big brand names and modest opening hours (Fitzgerald, 2013).

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